Hertford Witches

power of [one's] own being." Some of the texts included Christian elements, such as the establishing of a closer relationship with Jesus, the "Master of Masters." Members circulated various Catholic and Anglican writings and sermons. These were omitted from the materials published by Regardie. Elements of Golden Dawn rituals, Rosicrucianism and Freemasonry have been absorbed into the rituals of modern Witchcraft.

See DION Fortune; HERMETICA; MAGIC; FRANCIS ISRAEL REGARDIE.

Further READING:

Gilbert, R. A. Golden Dawn: Twilight of the Magicians. Wellingborough, Northhamptonshire, England: The Aquarian Press, 1983.

MacGregor-Mathers, S. L. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin the Mage. Wellingborough, England: The Aquarian Press, 1976. Regardie, Israel. The Golden Dawn. 5th ed. St. Paul: Llewellyn Publications, 1986.

-. What You Should Know About the Golden Dawn. 3rd ed. Phoenix: Falcon Press, 1983. Symonds, John, and Kenneth Grant, eds. The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, An Autobiography. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1979.

Hermitage Castle Ruined castle near Newcastleton in Roxburgshire, Scotland, reputed to be haunted because of malign black MAGIC and witchcraft practiced by Lord Soulis, its owner and occupant in the 13th century.

Soulis is alleged to have practiced black magic. He kidnapped young farm children, imprisoned them in the castle's dungeon and sacrificed them in dark rites. He had a FAMILIAR Redcap Sly (see REDCAP), who appeared in the form of a horrible old man with vampire-like fangs. Redcap Sly told his master that he could be bound only by a three-stranded rope of sand. Soulis magically made Redcap impervious to weapons. The familiar became so troublesome to him, however, that Soulis resorted to destroying him by boiling him in oil in a brazen pot.

There are different versions of the lord's demise, which sound like variations on the fate of Redcap Sly. According to one story, the enraged parents of the murdered children stormed the castle and attacked Soulis. He was bound in iron chains and a blanket of lead and boiled to death. According to another story, he abducted the Laird of Branxholm, a crime for which he was bound in a sheet of lead and boiled to death.

Ghostly sounds of the young murder victims reportedly are heard coming from within the castle.

FuRTHER READING:

Briggs, Katharine. An Encyclopedia of Fairies. New York: Pantheon, 1976.

Folklore, Myths and Legends of Britain. London: Reader's

Digest Assoc., 1977. Green, Andrew. Our Haunted Kingdom. London: Wolfe Publishing Limited, 1973.

Herne the Hunter A spectral huntsman of English lore, often the leader of the WILD Hunt or the nocturnal processions of the dead. As leader of the Wild Hunt, Herne has lunar associations. His name is associated with another leader of the dead, Herlechin, or Harlequin, also associated with the DEVIL. Herne is portrayed wearing an antlered headdress. In modern Witchcraft, he is associated with the HORNED GOD, and with CERNuNNOS and PAN. Sightings of Herne are still reported in Windsor Forest near Windsor Castle and are associated with Witchcraft activities. Similar spectral horned huntsmen exist in German and French lore.

Hertford Witches (d. 1606) Two women executed for crimes committed by witchcraft in Royston, England. Joan Harrison and her daughter were widely believed to practice malevolent SPELLS and BEWITCHMENT, including deaths.

At the time of Joan Harrison's arrest in the summer of 1606, she had long been regarded as a local witch. Her house was searched and incriminating evidence was found—human bones and hair and a drawing on parchment of a human body and heart. Harrison readily confessed that she used these items to cast spells. By pricking a body part on the drawing, she could cause torment, even death, to a person at a distance. She was aided by two FAMILIARS, she said, one for spells against people and one for spells against cattle.

She confessed to tormenting a neighbor with whom she had argued and who had called her an "old hag." She promised revenge, and soon he fell ill with great bodily pain, as though he were being tortured. Believing himself to be bewitched, he visited Harrison and drew her blood by scratching her (see BLOOD), which brought an end to his torment.

Harrison turned the tables on him by having him arrested and charged for battery. She won her case in court and was awarded five pounds and her trial costs. The man paid her and then suffered a relapse of pains and died.

Later, Harrison was out in a street and passed a house where a young woman was washing clothes with her baby next to her in a cradle. The woman dumped her rinse water just as Harrison was passing, and some of it fell on her. The woman apologized, but Harrison said she would have revenge for the offense. Within a short time, the cradle overturned and shattered, and the woman's baby was killed.

Harrison bewitched a young woman into sickness. The spell was broken by her brother. In revenge, Harrison killed all of his cattle. The brother died soon thereafter.

One of Harrison's final bewitchments was against a drunk at an alehouse who argued with her and called her vile names. After she departed, he felt ill and blamed her. He tracked her down and attacked her, nearly scratching out her eyes.

Soon after this incident, Harrison was arrested, along with her daughter. Harrison was charged with other

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