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Hell Really Exists

Hell Really Exists

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The common opinions of Witches con-

trafifmg with Divels, Spirits, or Familiars ; and their power to kill, torment, and confuroe the bodies of men women, and children, or other creatines by difeafes orotherwifes their flying in th^ Air, &c. To be but imaginary Etronious conceptions and novelties > WHEREIN ALSO, The lewde unchriftian pra&ife^ of Witchmongers^upon aged, melancholy, ignorant, and fuperftious people in extorting con-fcflions, by inhunwiic tenors and tortures is notably detefted.

"The knavery and confederacy of'Conjurors. The impious blafphemy of Inchanters. The impoftureof Soothfaycri, and Infidelity of Atheifts. The deluGon of Pythonifts, Figurc-caftcrs, Aftrologers., and va-

j The fruitlefle tcggcrly art of Alchimiftry. J The horrible art of JPoifoiling and all the tricks and cdnvey-^ ances of juggling and Liegerdcmain are fully deciphered,

With many other things opened that have long lain hidden: though very neceflaty to be known for the undeceiving of Judges,Juftices, and Juries, and for the prefcrvation of poor,aged, deformed* ignorant people; frequently taken, arraigned, condemned aud executed for Witches, when according to a right underftanding, and a good confcience* Phyiick, Food, and neceiTaries ihould be adminiftred to them*

Whereunto is added, a treatlfe upon the nature,and fubihnce of Spirits anil Divels, dec. all written and published in Anno i^.hy Reginald Scot t tinted by R. C. and are to be /old by Giles Calvert, dwelling at the _BUck, Spread-Eagle at the Weft-end of Pauls, 1651.

To the Honorable, mine efteciaU good LordyS« Roger Manwood Knigfyt,

. rPord chief Baron of her Majejites Court I 3D* 4"" of the Efchequer4 a

N-io-much as I know that yoiii| Lordihip is by nature wholly inclined^ and in purpoie earrieftly bent to relieve the poor, and that not onely with holpitality arid. almes , but by divers other de-vifesand waies tending to their comfort., having ( as it were ) framed and fet your felfto the help and maintenance of their eftate5 as apptareth by your charge and travell in that behalf. Whereas alio you have a fpeciall cafe for the fup-porting of; their; right, and redrefling of their wrongs^as neither defpifing their calamity, nor yet forgetting their complaint, feekingall means for their amendment,1 and foi the reformation of their > di fordeE s^even as a very father to the poor. Finally, for thatlama poor w ember of that Common-wealth where your Lordfhip is, aprincipall perfon* I thought this my travell, in thebehalfof the poor, {he aged, [and the (impie, might be very fitly commended unto you : \for a weak houferequireth a .ftrongfhy: In which rtfpeft I give God thanks3 iffiat hath raifed upuitto me fo mighty a friend for £ ml4GbA them

them as ycHir Lbrdftip is> whoin knit 1a*i have i (uch knowledge, in government fuch discretion¿ ' inthefe caufesluchexperience, and in the Common* wealth fuch authority , and never the lefle vouchfafe todefcendtotheconfideration of thefe bafeand inferior matters, which winifter more care and trouble than worldly eftimation.

And inibmucfr as your Lordihip knoiimh, orra-therexcercifeth the office of a Judge, whofepartit is to hear with courteiie, and to determine with e* quity* it cannot but be apparent unto you, that when puniibment e*ceedeth the fault, it is rather to be thought vengeance than corre&ion. In which refpcct I know you fpend more time and tra-veil in the converfion and reformation, than in the fubverfion and confufion of offenders, as being well v pleafed to augment your own private pains, to the end yon may diminish their publike fmart. For in truth, that Common-wealth remaineth in wofull ftate, where fetters and halters bear more fway than mercy and due compaffion*

Howbeit, k is Raturall to unnatural! people, and peculiar unto witchmopger?, to purfu© the poor, to accufe the iimpte, and to kill the innocent * fopply ing in rigor and malice towards others, that which they themielves want In proof and difcretiony or the other in offenceor occaiion- But as a cmelbeart and an honeft minde do feldome meet and feed together in a diih$ fo a difcreet h merciful Magiftrate, | and a happy Common*wealth cannot be feparated | afunder. How much then are we bound to God* 9 who hath given ut a Queen ¿hat of juiHce is not on- | ly the very perfcft imageznA paten^but alio of mere/ | and clement} ( under Qod) the mecr founUin ana> |

7fo Epiflfa body it fclf ? Infomuch as they which hunt moft after bloud in thefe daies, have leaft authority toihed it. Moreover, fith I fee that in cafeswhere lenity might be noifotn, and punijhment wholfom to the com* mon-wealth 5 there no refpeft of perfon can move you, no authority can abajh you^ no fear, no threats can daunt you in performing the duty of Juftice,

In that refpect again I find your Lordihip a fit perfon to judge & look upon this prefent Treatife. Wherein I will bring before you, as it were to the bar, two forts of moft arrogant and wickcd people, thefirft challenging to themielves,the fecond attributing unto others, that power which only apper-teineth to God, who ontly ts the Creator of all things, Apo 4 , It svhoonely fcarcheth the heart and reines , whoondy Rom 8. knomth our imaginations and thoughts , who onely 5* openeth allftents , who onely worketh great wonder/, Lup£*, who onely hath power to raife upandaii dovnt^wbo Dan. 28* onely mak$th thunder, lightning,rain, tempefts, and pf^V72t reftraincth them at his pleafure* who onelyfendeth & 136. life and death, fickncjfe and health,xnalth and wo\ who jeremy neither giveth nor lendetb hk glory ts any creature. samnef ilf'

And therfore^that which grieveth me to the bot-«Reg.a. torn of my heart,is that thefe witchmongers cannot » be content to wreft out of Gods hand hig almighty 2™ ,'0#'fe i4. power,& keep it themfelvs,or leav it with a witch: Amos.4. V but that$when by drift of argument they are made J^^g, to lay down the bucklers,they yield them up to the diyil,or at the leaft pray aide of him, as though the rains of all mens lives and aftions were committed into his hand^and that he fat at the ftern,to guide & direa the courie of the whole world,imputing unto him power & ability enough to do as great things, and as ftrange miracles as ever Chrift did.

But the do&orsof this iupernatural doftrine fay -________A 2 foire<

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fometfme$y that the witch doth all thefethirigs by yertue of her charms 5 fometimesthatafpiritual, fometimes that a corporal devil doth accomplish its ibmetimes; they fay that the devil doth but make the witch beleeve ihedpth that which hehimfelfe hath wrought *fometiaies that the devil feemeth to do that bycompulfion^vbich he doth moft willingly. Finally5the writers hereupon are fo eloquent,& full of variety $that fomtimesthey write that the devil doth all this by Gods permiflion orjiy^ iota times by his licence, fometimes by his appointment: fo as (in effeftand truth)rtot the devil, bat the high and mighty King ofkings, and Lord of hofts5even God himfelfjihould this way be made obedient and fer-vile to obey and perform the will 8c commandment of a malicious old witcb38c!miraculouf]y to anfwer her appetite, as well in every ti ifling vanity, as in mod horrible execu tions^as the revenger of a doting old^Wpmans imagined wrongs5to tbedeftru$ion of ma*iy innocent children; and as a fupporter of her paflions, to the undoing of many a poor foul. And Ifeenot3buta witch may as wellinchant, when (he wilHas a lier may lie when he lift: and fo ihould we poGefle nothing, but by a witches licence and permifficn. ^

: And now forfooth it is brought tathis point,that all.devils, which were wont to befpiritual, may at their pleafurebietpmecorpo^and fofhew them-felves familiarly to witches and conjurors., and to noneother^and by th6m only may be made tame, and kept in a box^c. So as a malicious old woman may command her devil tP plague her neighbor: & he isaffli&ed in manner 8c form as (he defireth; But then cometh another witch3and (he biddeth her devil help,and he healeth the'fame party. Soasthey make make it a kingdomedivided in itfelf^and therefore' I truft it will not long endure^but will fhortly be o-veithrown3 according to the words of our Saviour^ Omne regttttm in fe divifum dzfohbitur9 Every kitig-; dcmedividedinitfeliihallbedefolate. j : ! . ..

And although fome fay that thedevil is the witches inftrument, 10 bring her puipofes and pra&ifesto paffe:y.et others fay thatjhe is his inftrument^to execute his. pleafure in any things and therefore to be executed. But then (me thinks) (he ihould be iiiju-rioufly dealt withall>and put to death for another^ offence for aftionsarenot judged by inftrument-al caufes 5 neither doth the end and purpofe of that iwhich is done,depend upon the mean inftrument. Finally?if the witch do it no^why ihould the witch die for it/ But they fay that witches are perfwad-ed and think9that they do indeed thofe mifchifs$ 8c ,have a will to perform that which the devil commit-ttthvandthatthereforethey are worthy tody. By which reafon evxy one ihould be exectited?that wi* fhetheviltohisneighbor5&c.Butifthewill ihould be punifhed by man5 according to the offence againft God, we ihould be driven by thou&nds at onoe tP theilauterhoufe or butchery,For whofoeverldath- prDVeibs 5. eth corre&ion ihall die. And who fliould efcape exu ecution^if thislothfomneife(l fay) ihould extend to death by the civil Jawes. Alfothe reward offin is de ath. Howbeit3every one that fir neth ,is n ot to fe put to deaih by the Magiftr&te.But my Lord iffhall be proved in my book5 and your Lordihip ihall trier ? it to be true, 2s well here at home in your native ^ country3as alio abrode in your feveral circuits, that . . 5 (befidefc them that beFe^^^which are plainepoi-: foners)there will befound amdngour witchesfPn-lytwo fortstthe one fortbeingfuch by imputatm&s fo

Lihdt lamiis

7he Eplftle*

fo thought of by others(and thcfc are abufed, anM not abuforsjthe other by acceptation^* being wiK ling fo tobeaccounted & thefebemeer coufener*, jnjjiM^cap. Calvine treating of thefe magicians,callcth them «Jon DeJ.cX coufeners,fay ing3that they ufe their juggling knacks only to amaie or abufe the f>eople$ or elle for fame; . but he might rather have faid for gain. Eraftns him-1 h felf,being a principal writer in the behalf of witches omnipotency^ forced to confes^that thefe Greekjtordi tmyU> /uayy&yict, w/mkI*, are motlCOMMOly putfot illufion falfe packingsconjenagejraud,knavery andde-ceipt: & is further driven to faysthat in ancient time% the learned were not fo blockjjhps not to fee that the * promifes oi magicians and inch anters were falfe, and nothing el fe but knavery ,coufenage & old wives fan blet-fii yet defendeth he their flying in theaires their]| transferring of corn or gr as from one field to another^ &c But as Era fins difagreeth herein with himfelf and his friends:fo is there no agreement among any ol thofe writes's,but only in cruelties, abfurdities & im-pojfibilies.And thefe(my Lord)that fall into fo mani-feft contradiftions, and into fuch abfurd aiftvera-t ions,are not of the inferior fort of writers $ neither are they all papiftsjym men of fuch account,as whojc names give more credit to their caufe, thentheif$ writings.In whofebehalfe I am forty,and partly for S reverence fupprefs their fondtft errors & fouleft ab-S furdities^dealing fpecially with them that ntofi ccn■' tend in cruelty jxhofe feet are fwift tofind bloodflriving ifaiah 7. Ca8 Jifas ihe ion of Stretch faith & haftingfa Solomon Rom.3 i5- the ton ofDavid faithj/tf four out the blood of the In• Pro!*! 7t voCin^ whtif? heat again if thefe poor vPretches cannot be Jaemy 2 34. Mated frith any other liquor then blood* And therfbrel

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Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

Magick is the art and practice of moving natural energies to effect needed or wanted change. Magick is natural, there is absolutely nothing supernatural about it. What is taught here are various techniques of magick for beginners. Magick is natural and simple and the techniques to develop abilities should be simple and natural as well. What is taught on this site is not only the basics of magick, but the basics of many things.

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