Nanchuan Rejects Both A Monk and Layman

A monk came to Nan-Ch'uan, stood in front of him, and put both hands to his breast. Nan-Ch'uan said, You are too much of a layman. The monk then placed his bands palm to palm. 'You are too much of a monk, said Nan-Ch'uan. The monk could not say a word. When another teacher heard of this, he said to his monks, If were the monk, I would free my hands and walk away backward. NYOGEN When the monk came for sanzen, he meant to express his freedom by not conforming to the rules of entering or leaving...

Mountain Snow

Mountain snow, each region white Common the raven calling No good comes of too much slumber. Mountain snow, deep dingle white Woods bend before wind's onslaught Many couples are in love And never come together. Mountain snow, wind scatters it Moonlight far-spread, leaves pale Rare the rogue who claims no rights. Mountain snow, stag nimble Common to Britain, proud princes A stranger requires cunning. Mountain snow, stag in rut Ducks on the lake, ocean white Slow the old, soon overtaken. Mountain...

The Voyage of Bran Son of Febal

pg. 589 of Taliesin by Edward Williams, 1848 Editor's Note The following extensive poem from the Irish is about a young prince who journeys by boat into the land of faeries. Islands were considered somewhat magical by the Celtic peoples. References to the afterlife can be found in the descriptions of what faeries do to pass the time. It's really long, but good. 'Twas fifty quatrains that the woman from unknown lands sang on the floor of the house to Bran son of Febal, when the royal house was...